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Dolls: What?

All LHF adventures star my 1:6 action figures, many of them customized by me, my glue gun, my paints and my hack saw.  

People who see my dolls for the first time often call them Barbies, but they differ from Mattel’s iconic fashion doll in several key ways. While most Barbies have very slender bodies with few points of articulation, action figs, both male and female, have meatier builds and many joints. My dolls can cross their arms, tuck their legs underneath them and hang their heads realistically. Barbies and other fashion dolls can rarely stand alone on their small, pointed feet; by contrast, action figures have comparatively large, flat and stable feet so that they can pose more better. Similarly, action figs also have large, detailed hands so that they can actually hold their accessories. Think of action figs as Barbie’s tougher cousins.

Once visitors learn that my dolls aren’t Barbies, they wonder where I get them. In fact, most of my dolls come from several different sources, like plastic Frankenstein’s monsters. As a kitbasher and customizer, I take heads, hands, hair and outfits from many different sources to create characters that match my mind’s eye. For example, my Will doll has a custom resin head sculpt [done by eydyllhands, not me], a neck piece from a True Type body by Hot Toys, a slim male body by Obitsu, hands from a RAH body by Medicom and ankle cups and feet from a Cy Girl by Takara.

That being said, I do have my favorite sources for figure parts, most of which I get online. Many of my female characters have bodies [and frequently heads] from various Cy Girls by Japanese toymaker Takara [example U.S. dealer: HobbyLink Japan] and their American cousins, Perfect Bodies by BBI [example U.S. dealer: War Toys]. I don’t have a preferred maker for male characters’ bodies, who come from DML, BBI and other sources. Secondary and tertiary characters also draw body parts from Obitsu, a Japanese manufacturer of inexpensive, highly articulated figs [example U.S. dealer: Junky Spot]. Sometimes I even like Barbie heads and paint jobs enough to use them for my characters.

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